Friday, August 3, 2012

Violence Threatens Syrian Life and Cultural Heritage

As fighting continues to rage in Aleppo, Damascus and other cities across the country, the Syrian people and their cultural heritage face a dire threat. In addition to the estimated 20,000 people who have perished during 17 months of civil unrest, the Syrian rebellion has witnessed the looting of museums, destruction of archaeological ruins and damage to historic monuments, including the crusader-era castle of the Crac des Chevaliers (pictured above).

The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) has issued a warning aimed at this imminent threat to Syrian cultural security, focusing on the city of Aleppo, which has been included on the UNESCO World Heritage List since 1986. “ICOMOS is extremely concerned about the risks of any heavy conflict that may threaten the World Heritage site of Aleppo and the other precious cultural heritage of the city.

The ICOMOS plea follows a similar appeal issued by UNESCO calling for the protection of Aleppo. In a statement issued July 26, 2012, UNESCO voiced its concerns “about the risks of looting and pillaging of cultural property” in Syria’s largest city, and urged the country’s government to adhere to the tenets set forth by the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict, of which Syria was a signatory.

The hope for peace in this war-torn nation was dealt an ominous blow with the resignation (effective August 31) of Kofi Annan as United Nations and Arab League envoy following the failure of his peace plan.  His replacement has yet to be appointed.

With threats from both President Bashar al Assad and the revolting Free Syrian Army to intensify military actions during the upcoming weeks, Syria faces an ever-increasing threat to the lives of its populace and to its cultural heritage.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

(Source: csmonitor.com)

Thursday, June 21, 2012
israelfacts:

Tourism in Israeli settlements: Practice shooting Palestinians
Summer camp, warfare style: Like a frozen turkey plunged into boiling oil, a group of American tourists descend from an air-conditioned van into the scorching heat of the West Bank. Flashing smiles all around, they march into Caliber 3, a local shooting range.
“Move it!” the Israeli guide suddenly yells. “Destroy that terrorist,” he orders them, and they charge, guns loaded, at cardboard targets.
Gush Etzion has become a hot destination in recent months for tourists seeking an Israeli experience like no other: The opportunity to pretend-shoot a terror operative. Residents of the nearby settlements, who run the site, offer day-trippers a chance to hear stories from the battleground, watch a simulated assassination of terrorists by guards, and fire weapons at the range.
Five-year-old sniper
Michel Brown, 40, a Miami banker, chose to take his wife and three children to the range with the purpose of “teaching them values.”
Upon entering the range, his five-year-old daughter (above), Tamara, bursts into tears. A half hour later, she is holding a gun and shooting clay bullets like a pro.
“This is part of their education,” Michel says as he proudly watches his daughter. “They should know where they come from and also feel some action.”
Read full article
The word used for terrorist in Hebrew is “Mechabel” (mechablim for terrorists). In Israeli discourse this is a synonym for Palestinian.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

israelfacts:

Tourism in Israeli settlements: Practice shooting Palestinians

Summer camp, warfare style: Like a frozen turkey plunged into boiling oil, a group of American tourists descend from an air-conditioned van into the scorching heat of the West Bank. Flashing smiles all around, they march into Caliber 3, a local shooting range.

“Move it!” the Israeli guide suddenly yells. “Destroy that terrorist,” he orders them, and they charge, guns loaded, at cardboard targets.

Gush Etzion has become a hot destination in recent months for tourists seeking an Israeli experience like no other: The opportunity to pretend-shoot a terror operative. Residents of the nearby settlements, who run the site, offer day-trippers a chance to hear stories from the battleground, watch a simulated assassination of terrorists by guards, and fire weapons at the range.

Five-year-old sniper

Michel Brown, 40, a Miami banker, chose to take his wife and three children to the range with the purpose of “teaching them values.”

Upon entering the range, his five-year-old daughter (above), Tamara, bursts into tears. A half hour later, she is holding a gun and shooting clay bullets like a pro.

“This is part of their education,” Michel says as he proudly watches his daughter. “They should know where they come from and also feel some action.”

Read full article

The word used for terrorist in Hebrew is “Mechabel” (mechablim for terrorists). In Israeli discourse this is a synonym for Palestinian.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Thursday, June 14, 2012
The Wrath of the Shabiha: Gang Violence in Syria
The details of the recent massacres in the Syrian district of Houla and the farming hamlet of Mazraat al-Qubeir were bloodcurdling: children shot point-blank, throats slit, skulls crushed, entire families gunned down in their homes, the stench of charred human flesh, the paucity of survivors. The dead have been buried, but the question remains: Who could do this? Who could commit what U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon described as “unspeakable barbarity?” “Not even a monster,” insisted Syrian President Bashar Assad. But what about a shabih? 
The gangs known as the shabiha — the plural of shabih — along with uniformed elements of the security forces, were blamed by many observers and witnesses for both massacres. (Some regime sources, however, say that rebels had a hand in the killings.) In an increasingly bloody 15-month crisis, the shabiha have become increasingly prominent as irregular paramilitary troops, regime enforcers and the go-to guys when the going gets tough and bloody. 
Their origins go back to the late 1970s and early ’80s, when Assad‘s father and uncles ran the country. The father Hafez Assad was President, his brother Rifaat had a pivotal role in the security forces and his other brother Jamil was setting up and consolidating his shadowy business dealings, which allegedly included drug trafficking and weapons smuggling, according to Radwan Ziadeh, a longtime member of the Syrian opposition. The gangs, initially drawn from the Assads’ extended family and their Alawite sect, were described as mafia enforcers. “They made their living from smuggling [electrical goods, tobacco, drugs, alcohol, antiquities, etc.] and imposing ‘taxes’ [extortion],” Syrian writer Yassin al-Haj Salih said in a recent report published in Germany. “They were noted for their brutality and cruelty and their blind devotion to their leaders.” Read more 
For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

The Wrath of the Shabiha: Gang Violence in Syria

The details of the recent massacres in the Syrian district of Houla and the farming hamlet of Mazraat al-Qubeir were bloodcurdling: children shot point-blank, throats slit, skulls crushed, entire families gunned down in their homes, the stench of charred human flesh, the paucity of survivors. The dead have been buried, but the question remains: Who could do this? Who could commit what U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon described as “unspeakable barbarity?” “Not even a monster,” insisted Syrian President Bashar Assad. But what about a shabih? 

The gangs known as the shabiha — the plural of shabih — along with uniformed elements of the security forces, were blamed by many observers and witnesses for both massacres. (Some regime sources, however, say that rebels had a hand in the killings.) In an increasingly bloody 15-month crisis, the shabiha have become increasingly prominent as irregular paramilitary troops, regime enforcers and the go-to guys when the going gets tough and bloody. 

Their origins go back to the late 1970s and early ’80s, when Assad‘s father and uncles ran the country. The father Hafez Assad was President, his brother Rifaat had a pivotal role in the security forces and his other brother Jamil was setting up and consolidating his shadowy business dealings, which allegedly included drug trafficking and weapons smuggling, according to Radwan Ziadeh, a longtime member of the Syrian opposition. The gangs, initially drawn from the Assads’ extended family and their Alawite sect, were described as mafia enforcers. “They made their living from smuggling [electrical goods, tobacco, drugs, alcohol, antiquities, etc.] and imposing ‘taxes’ [extortion],” Syrian writer Yassin al-Haj Salih said in a recent report published in Germany. “They were noted for their brutality and cruelty and their blind devotion to their leaders.” Read more 

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Saturday, June 9, 2012
fotojournalismus:

A demonstrator carries a portrait of Egyptian Khaled Said on the second anniversary of Said’s death in Cairo on June 6, 2012. Said, 28, was beaten to death by police in Alexandria in June 2010 after he posted a video showing police officers sharing the spoils of a drugs bust, according to his family. The act of brutality galvanized further protests, in particular, the anti-torture Facebook page.
Tens of thousands of political prisoners suffered torture under Hosni Mubarak’s 29-year rule. Virtually all the abuses perpetrated under Mubarak’s regime have gone unpunished.
One of the extreme cases of brutality ended in the death of 28-year-old Khaled Said, in Alexandria. Beaten to death by two police officers in June 2010, his name became a rallying call of the uprising. “We are all Khalid Said,” was the name of the Facebook group that helped organize the early protests.
[Credit : Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

A demonstrator carries a portrait of Egyptian Khaled Said on the second anniversary of Said’s death in Cairo on June 6, 2012. Said, 28, was beaten to death by police in Alexandria in June 2010 after he posted a video showing police officers sharing the spoils of a drugs bust, according to his family. The act of brutality galvanized further protests, in particular, the anti-torture Facebook page.

Tens of thousands of political prisoners suffered torture under Hosni Mubarak’s 29-year rule. Virtually all the abuses perpetrated under Mubarak’s regime have gone unpunished.

One of the extreme cases of brutality ended in the death of 28-year-old Khaled Said, in Alexandria. Beaten to death by two police officers in June 2010, his name became a rallying call of the uprising. “We are all Khalid Said,” was the name of the Facebook group that helped organize the early protests.

[Credit : Amr Abdallah Dalsh / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Friday, June 1, 2012
fotojournalismus:

An Egyptian flowers vendor stands in front of graffiti depicting president Hosni Mubarak as he waits for a customer in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, May 31, 2012, two days before Mubarak is to hear the verdict on charges of corruption and complicity in killing protesters during last year’s uprising.
[Credit : Amr Nabil/AP]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

An Egyptian flowers vendor stands in front of graffiti depicting president Hosni Mubarak as he waits for a customer in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, May 31, 2012, two days before Mubarak is to hear the verdict on charges of corruption and complicity in killing protesters during last year’s uprising.

[Credit : Amr Nabil/AP]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

When Revolution Leads to Robbery and Death

In times of political chaos and uncertainty, thieves find a way to thrive. Egypt is no exception.

Nearly a year and a half after President Hosni Mubarak resigned amid protest from the populace, Egypt faces an ever-increasing threat to its cultural heritage.

Illegal excavations have become rampant across the country, many of which are focused upon treasured landmarks, such as the pyramids at Giza. According to the Egyptian Interior Ministry,  5697 illicit digs have been carried out since early 2011, one hundred times more than the previous year.

At least 35 people have lost their lives partaking in such illegal activities, including ten who were buried alive in March when the pit in which they were digging caved in. Countless others have been killed while protesting against police brutality and military rule.

As the country’s police and security forces sit idly by watching thieves and opportunists rob Egypt of its national heritage, who can the country and its people turn to for cultural security?

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

(Source: yearof1989.wordpress.com)

Tuesday, May 8, 2012
fotojournalismus:

A boy cries as he holds his sister in his lap after a confrontation between squatters and police in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2012. Riot police in Katmandu arrested more than 20 protesters on Tuesday during clashes sparked by an attempt to evict landless squatters from their homes. Dozens were injured. The demolition drive follows a Nepali government decision to force the squatters out from an area beside the Thapathali hospital and move them to an alternative settlement along with the introduction of a property ownership document, according to local media reports.
[Credit : Bikash Dware / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

A boy cries as he holds his sister in his lap after a confrontation between squatters and police in Kathmandu, Nepal, May 8, 2012. Riot police in Katmandu arrested more than 20 protesters on Tuesday during clashes sparked by an attempt to evict landless squatters from their homes. Dozens were injured. The demolition drive follows a Nepali government decision to force the squatters out from an area beside the Thapathali hospital and move them to an alternative settlement along with the introduction of a property ownership document, according to local media reports.

[Credit : Bikash Dware / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Monday, April 23, 2012
fotojournalismus:

A woman runs along a road during an air strike by the Sudanese air force in Rubkona on April 23, 2012. Sudanese warplanes carried out air strikes on South Sudan on Monday, killing three people near a southern oil town, residents and military officials said, three days after South Sudan pulled out of a disputed oil field. A Reuters reporter at the scene, outside the oil town of Bentiu, said he saw a fighter aircraft drop two bombs near a river bridge between Bentiu and the neighboring town of Rubkona. 
[Credit : Goran Tomasevic / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

A woman runs along a road during an air strike by the Sudanese air force in Rubkona on April 23, 2012. Sudanese warplanes carried out air strikes on South Sudan on Monday, killing three people near a southern oil town, residents and military officials said, three days after South Sudan pulled out of a disputed oil field. A Reuters reporter at the scene, outside the oil town of Bentiu, said he saw a fighter aircraft drop two bombs near a river bridge between Bentiu and the neighboring town of Rubkona. 

[Credit : Goran Tomasevic / Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Friday, April 20, 2012
fotojournalismus:

Kadiatu Kauma, 24, sits in hospital with gunshot wounds to her arm, stomach and back after police opened fire on a crowd of protesters in the mining town of Bumbuna April 19, 2012. A woman was shot and killed and several others were wounded when police opened fire on a crowd protesting wages and working conditions at the British mining company African Minerals on Wednesday, according to witnesses, hospital staff and police officials.
[Credit : Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

Kadiatu Kauma, 24, sits in hospital with gunshot wounds to her arm, stomach and back after police opened fire on a crowd of protesters in the mining town of Bumbuna April 19, 2012. A woman was shot and killed and several others were wounded when police opened fire on a crowd protesting wages and working conditions at the British mining company African Minerals on Wednesday, according to witnesses, hospital staff and police officials.

[Credit : Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Wednesday, April 18, 2012
fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian protester throws a molotov cocktail towards Israeli security forces during clashes outside Ofer prison near the West Bank city of Ramallah April 17, 2012. The clashes broke out during a rally marking Palestinian Prisoners Day. At least 1,200 Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails launched an open-ended hunger strike on Tuesday, upping the stakes in a protest movement that has put the Jewish state under pressure.
[Credit : Mohamad Torokman/Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

fotojournalismus:

A Palestinian protester throws a molotov cocktail towards Israeli security forces during clashes outside Ofer prison near the West Bank city of Ramallah April 17, 2012. The clashes broke out during a rally marking Palestinian Prisoners Day. At least 1,200 Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails launched an open-ended hunger strike on Tuesday, upping the stakes in a protest movement that has put the Jewish state under pressure.

[Credit : Mohamad Torokman/Reuters]

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Monday, April 16, 2012

When Economic Policy Threatens Cultural Security

In times of economic crisis, a nation’s artistic and cultural programs often suffer harsh fates. The financial woes facing Greece have forced the struggling country to levy strict economic austerity measures to combat years of government corruption and deficit spending.

These drastic measures have forced the Greek Ministry of Culture to begin firing up to 50% of its personnel , including archaeologists, civil servants and guards assigned to protect and preserve cultural heritage sites and museums. Such cutbacks already have resulted in the looting of museums in Olympia and Athens.

Government plans to raise funds by allowing advertising at Greek cultural heritage sites, such as the Acropolis, have been met with shock and outrage. In a particularly ironic twist, as Greek archaeologists struggle to find funding for legitimate excavations and face the threat of unemployment, smugglers of illicit antiquities continue to thrive.

From the public suicide of a single citizen to protests involving thousands, Greeks have taken to the streets to protest the dire economic situation, and the resulting threat to Greek cultural heritage. Unfortunately, after almost two years of violence and civil unrest, an end to this crisis and the subsequent threat to cultural security seems nowhere in sight. 

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Images courtesy of http://www.opednews.com/articles/Greece-in-flames-Cassandr-by-Eric-Walberg-120214-446.html 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2010/may/04/markets-give-greek-bailout-lukewarm-reception

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Syrian archaeological treasures in “ruins” during revolt

The ongoing uprising in Syria has witnessed not only the death of thousands of protestors, but also the looting and destruction of treasured archaeological sites throughout the country. The theft of ancient artifacts from archaeological excavations in Apamea, Palmyra and Hama, as well as from nearby museums in those cities has become epidemic.

More recently, rebel forces have occupied Crusade-era castles and citadels, such as the Krak des Chevaliers (pictured above), which have suffered irreparable damage during fighting between the insurgents and government forces.

In spite of UNESCO’s pleas that measures be taken to protect Syria’s cultural heritage during these violent times, the country and its archaeological treasures remain at risk.

For similar news stories visit  http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Thursday, April 5, 2012
futurejournalismproject:

Photographing Greek Protests
The New York Times Lens Blog profiles Angelos Tzortzinis, a 28-year-old Greek photographer who’s been shooting his country’s protests over austerity measures.
His ideal shooting location, he says, is between the protestors and the police.
Via the New York Times:

Taking photos during demonstrations in Athens can be very difficult — tear gas clouds create a suffocating atmosphere, people without gas masks run in all directions, while protesters who have masks hurl stones and Molotov cocktails.
To get his pictures, Mr. Tzortzinis says he must stand between the riot police and the protesters, every moment exposed to violence from either side. Many times photographers have been attacked by the riot police. But many times, too, they have lost their equipment after being attacked by angry protesters.

Image: A riot officer after being hit with a Molotov Cocktail, by Angelos Tzortzinis. Via the New York Times.
Tzortzinis’ work can be seen the Times’ link above as well as on his personal site.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

futurejournalismproject:

Photographing Greek Protests

The New York Times Lens Blog profiles Angelos Tzortzinis, a 28-year-old Greek photographer who’s been shooting his country’s protests over austerity measures.

His ideal shooting location, he says, is between the protestors and the police.

Via the New York Times:

Taking photos during demonstrations in Athens can be very difficult — tear gas clouds create a suffocating atmosphere, people without gas masks run in all directions, while protesters who have masks hurl stones and Molotov cocktails.

To get his pictures, Mr. Tzortzinis says he must stand between the riot police and the protesters, every moment exposed to violence from either side. Many times photographers have been attacked by the riot police. But many times, too, they have lost their equipment after being attacked by angry protesters.

Image: A riot officer after being hit with a Molotov Cocktail, by Angelos Tzortzinis. Via the New York Times.

Tzortzinis’ work can be seen the Times’ link above as well as on his personal site.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Saturday, March 31, 2012

Egyptian artists fight to take back the streets

In response to the ruling military’s decision to wall off several streets around Cairo’s Tahrir Square, the Egyptian artists group Revolution Artists Association took matters into their own hands (and brushes), creating a perspective painting that mimics in exact detail the appearance of the street behind the barricade.

The trompe-l’oeil painting known as “No Walls Street” and other examples of graffiti art throughout the city center have been employed as non-violent means to protest the rule of the military leaders who have seized power in the Egyptian capital, as well as the human rights violations—such as forced “virginity tests”—that continue to be perpetrated upon the citizenry.

Despite the victory of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party in recent parliamentary elections, the ruling military council continues to assert its authority. Vows issued by the generals in power that they will relinquish control, at least in part, by the end of June have been met with skepticism by much of the Egyptian population.

With the first round of presidential elections scheduled for May 23 and 24, and the newly elected president scheduled to assume office by June 30, the civil unrest in Egypt appears to be far from over.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Friday, March 2, 2012

Jordanian blogger stabbed after post that criticized royal family
March 1, 2012
REPORTING FROM BEIRUT— As blogger Enass Musallam of Jordan was leaving a cafe in the nation’s  capital last week, a man wearing a mask and gloves grabbed her from behind.

“In the name of his royal majesty and the prince,” the assailant said as he stabbed Musallam in the stomach,according to a statement by the press freedom group Committee to Protect Journalists, or CPJ. “Next time, you will be slaughtered,” he continued and put the knife to her throat before throwing her down a flight of stairs and fleeing.
A friend helped Musallam to a hospital, where she was treated for five days.
The Feb. 20 attack in Amman appears to be linked to Musallam’s critical writings about members of the Jordanian royal family. The day before she was stabbed, she reportedly wrote an article on her blog (link in Arabic) that criticized Prince Hassan bin Talal’s recent commentary about dispersing demonstrators in an Amman square. The blogger said his comments were offensive.


For the last year, Jordan has witnessed pro-democracy protests, pushing King Abdullah II to fire his previous cabinet and introduce reforms.
CPJ calls on the Jordanian authorities to initiate a “serious investigation” into the stabbing. The probe conducted so far has born no fruit. Instead, some authorities appear to be trying to discredit Musallam.
The Public Security Directorate investigated the incident and concluded that the stabbing resulted from a lovers’ falling out or a friends’ argument and that Musallam had demonstrated “volatile behavior,” according to CPJ. No arrests reportedly have been made.
Musallam also encountered problems with local police, telling CPJ that officers told her she had probably imagined the assault when she went to a station shortly after being released from the hospital. One officer called her a liar and told her she would not be able to continue her education at the university.
But Media Affairs and Communications Minister Rakan Majali condemned the stabbing, according to the local news site Ammon News. Majali wrote on his Facebook page that he rejected such thuggish acts and denounced those who stood with the attacker.
Reporters who have published critical writings of the royal family have faced threats in the past, while those that have covered demonstrations have been attacked by security forces and had their equipment confiscated.



For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm

Jordanian blogger stabbed after post that criticized royal family

March 1, 2012

REPORTING FROM BEIRUT— As blogger Enass Musallam of Jordan was leaving a cafe in the nation’s  capital last week, a man wearing a mask and gloves grabbed her from behind.

“In the name of his royal majesty and the prince,” the assailant said as he stabbed Musallam in the stomach,according to a statement by the press freedom group Committee to Protect Journalists, or CPJ. “Next time, you will be slaughtered,” he continued and put the knife to her throat before throwing her down a flight of stairs and fleeing.

A friend helped Musallam to a hospital, where she was treated for five days.

The Feb. 20 attack in Amman appears to be linked to Musallam’s critical writings about members of the Jordanian royal family. The day before she was stabbed, she reportedly wrote an article on her blog (link in Arabic) that criticized Prince Hassan bin Talal’s recent commentary about dispersing demonstrators in an Amman square. The blogger said his comments were offensive.

For the last year, Jordan has witnessed pro-democracy protests, pushing King Abdullah II to fire his previous cabinet and introduce reforms.

CPJ calls on the Jordanian authorities to initiate a “serious investigation” into the stabbing. The probe conducted so far has born no fruit. Instead, some authorities appear to be trying to discredit Musallam.

The Public Security Directorate investigated the incident and concluded that the stabbing resulted from a lovers’ falling out or a friends’ argument and that Musallam had demonstrated “volatile behavior,” according to CPJ. No arrests reportedly have been made.

Musallam also encountered problems with local police, telling CPJ that officers told her she had probably imagined the assault when she went to a station shortly after being released from the hospital. One officer called her a liar and told her she would not be able to continue her education at the university.

But Media Affairs and Communications Minister Rakan Majali condemned the stabbing, according to the local news site Ammon News. Majali wrote on his Facebook page that he rejected such thuggish acts and denounced those who stood with the attacker.

Reporters who have published critical writings of the royal family have faced threats in the past, while those that have covered demonstrations have been attacked by security forces and had their equipment confiscated.

For similar news stories visit http://culturalsecurity.net/newssummary.htm